The Scrum approach to agile software development marks a dramatic departure from waterfall management. Scrum and other agile methods were inspired by its shortcomings. Scrum emphasizes collaboration, functioning software, team self management, and the flexibility to adapt to emerging business realities.

November 2008

Scrum Effort Estimation and Story Points

Submitted by admin on Fri, 11/21/2008 - 14:30
Anxiety about estimation usually means the organization is not strong in the other Agile practices such as Test Driven Development (TDD). Scrum requires that the product be kept in a potentially shippable (e.g. properly tested/integrated) state every Sprint, that the Product Owner declares which work is top priority, and that work be split into thin vertical slices, typically customer-centric user stories no bigger than a few days each. If we're doing the other Agile stuff right, we cannot miss release dates because the product is shippable every week or two.

Scrum Acceptance Criteria

Submitted by admin on Mon, 11/10/2008 - 14:11

In Scrum, some Product Owners would never deem a team’s work truly done without consulting the story’s acceptance criteria. Acceptance criteria are the requirements that have to be met for a story to be assessed as complete. So what happens when only some—most, even—of a story’s acceptance criteria is met? Should the item be declared partially complete? No, what's not done is not done.

Agile Conference 2008

Submitted by admin on Tue, 11/04/2008 - 14:14
Here’s an interesting video I reposted from the Agile Journal website: an interview at the Agile 2008 conference in Toronto between Agile Journal reporter Patrick Egan and Victor Szalvay, co-founder of Danube Technologies, Inc. and Product Owner for the ScrumWorks Pro agile management tool. It only clocks in at about five minutes, but, in that time, Patrick and Victor cover a lot of ground.